Regina Schroeter

The Art of Deception Hearts Explained

Here you can read about each heart exhibited in The Art Of Deception Exhibition in the Sluisdeurenloods

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Observing The Art Of Deception -

NO. 1 - GHOST HEART
A decellularized pig heart
By using a biomedical procedure called decellularization, organs such as hearts and lungs can be harvested from the newly dead, stripped of the their cellular contents and re-engineered with the recipient’s own stem cells so they might beat again. The so-called “ghost heart” is the white protein scaffold of the heart upon which manipulations can be added.
Collaboration with Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam

NO. 2 - SHRUNKEN HEART
heart shrunken to 1/20th its original size
This small heart has the potential to do the work of a larger heart while leaving room for the enlargement of our other organs.

NO. 3 - HEART OF STEEL
An armoured heart coated with iron filings
With a series of magnets, an electromotor and custom electronics, the heart is reanimated with moving iron filings.
Collaboration with Suzanne van Beest

NO. 4 - HAND OVER HEART
A compressible foam heart
Re-casting the ghost heart into a two-component foam, the heart is given flexibility so it is able to take on stress of modern life.

NO. 5 - FASHION VICTIM
A laser engraved heart
In the future, individuals may have their hearts engraved with personal touches, or even use them as a status symbol or advertisement for high- fashion brand labels

NO. 6 - HEART RAN DRY
A dehydrated heart
After decellularization, hearts can be dried like jerky in airflow-cabinets. Balloons, which were being used to preserve the heart’s shape during the drying process, were subsequently removed.

NO. 7 - HEART OF DARKNESS
A rubber casted heart with temperature sensitive dye
With a strong air pump and custom electronics, a rubber casted heart can simultaneously inflate and change color, giving it new functionality. Thermochromic dye, allows the heart to change from black to white when the temperature rises.
Collaboration with Suzanne van Beest

(NO. 8 - FIRE HEART ) not on show here at Mediamatic
A heart pumped with fluorescent blood
By injecting the heart vessels with a mixture of resin and fluorescent dyes, the network of the heart becomes visible and coloured. Blacklight and custom electronics facilitate the changing of the vessels from transparent to red.
Collaboration with Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences Amsterdam

(NO. 9 - HEART OF THORNS) not on show here at Mediamatic
A tattooed heart
Humans have a long history of decorating their bodies with tattoos. In the future, we will be able to tattoo our inner organs to carry the names of our beloved ones even closer to our hearts.

NO. 10 - BROKEN HEART
A shell of a dissolved heart
A decellularized heart is dipped into several layers of hot wax. By then soaking it in sodium hydroxide, the original heart dissolved, and the wax cast cracked, allowing the heart’s weakest junctures to be exposed.

NO. 11 - BRIGHT HEART
heart wired with interactive lighting
Imagine a future, where our inner organs could interact with the outside world. Here a heart interacts with the spectators by using custom electronics and a sensor that triggers the heart to glow brighter if an individual approaches.

NO. 12 - SOFT HEART
A flocked heart.
Flocking, the process of introducing many small fibers onto a surface, can increase a heart’s aesthetics, tactile sensations and appearance. Here, flocking of a heart is used for functional purposes, insulating the heart with a warm custom fit black velvet.

(NO. 13 - QUEEN OF HEARTS) not on show here at Mediamatic
An embroidered heart
Using custom electronics, the heart becomes bright when the UV-sensitive yarn is activated by UV-lights. The embroidery patterns mimic cardiomyocites (heart cells) demonstrating how parts of the organ can be crafted in isolation.

NO. 14 - MISSING HEART
A tissue-less heart
By first injecting the vessels with resin, a cast of the veins can be separated from the rest of the heart. Sodium hydroxide is used to dissolve the heart tissue, leaving only the vessel network.
Collaboration with Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam

NO. 15 - INSIDE OUT
A heart’s interior
By cutting the heart open, and sewing it back together, but inside out, the heart’s interior is exposed, allowing nothing to be hidden.

NO. 16 - DEEP INSIDE MY HEART
A cast of the inside of the heart
Cast in resin, the muscle fibers of the heart are captured before they decay.

NO. 17 - TRUE HEART
A plastinated heart
Plastination is a technique used to preserve bodies or body parts first developed by Gunther von Hagens in 1977. The water and fat are replaced by plastics, producing objects that can be touched, do not smell or decay, and retain most properties of the original sample. In this way, manipulated, personalized hearts of the future can be preserved and passed down through generations.

NO. 18 - HEART OF THE BEAST
A heart growing hair
In the future, organs may share functions, taking on characteristics of other parts of the body. Here, a heart grows hair, which is normally a function of skin follicles.

NO. 19 - HEART OF STONE
A concrete heart jewelled with gold and silver
Will organs always be free from decoration? Vessels cast in first grade silver and 14 carats yellow gold decorate the first crowned heart, showing how wealth and status can infiltrate into organs.
Collaboration with Galerie PUUR

NO. 20 - HEART WEB
A regenerated crocheted heart
With a digital embroidery machine, the shape of the heart and its vessels can be designed from scratch. Here, the tissue was crocheted onto water dissolvable tissue.
Collaboration with Lise Lefebvre

NO. 21 - HEART OF MY HEART
3D printed heart
With new 3D printing techniques, an edited copy of the heart output can be transformed into a square rotating aorta for those who prefer sharp angles.
Collaboration with University Medical Center Utrecht